Apogee Journal presents

Writing Resistance:
Investigating / Subverting
Form & Narrative

A Writing Workshop Series

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Art as Activism: Crystal Hana Kim interviews Lena Khalaf Tuffaha

  I read Water & Salt very quickly, so immersed was I in Lena Khalaf Tuffaha’s poems and the way she transported the reader from America to Palestine to Syria and Jordan and back again. Water & Salt moves between motherhood, immigration, boundaries, language, and more without ever feeling diffuse or scattered. Through her deft language and imagery, Lena creates a debut collection that invites the reader to question the meaning of home and belonging in a time of unending violence. In our interview, we spoke about her personal and political inspirations, art as activism, and poetry as a means of traveling beyond the familiar confines of our own communities.          -Crystal Hana Kim   Crystal Hana Kim: Congratulations on publishing your first poetry book, Lena! I’d love to delve into these poems with you. In particular, I’m interested in structure, history, identity, and how all of that informs your writing. Let’s start at the beginning. When did you start writing poetry? What informs your poetry now and has that evolved throughout your writing career? Lena Khalaf Tuffaha: I’ve been writing poetry for about twelve years. In college, I still wrote in Arabic, or tried to, and then I began...
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FEELING OUR POSSIBLE VOLUMES: Jenni(f)fer Tamayo interviews Kay Ulanday Barrett

Jenni(f)fer Tamayo talks with poet, performer, and activist Kay Ulanday Barrett about definitions of work/labor in Sick and Disabled Queer People of Color experiences, how different levels of systemic violence impact one’s poetics, writing as embodied spiritual practice and activism, the ethics of performance, and how expansive definitions of care can be a source of resistance in Kay’s new poetry collection, When the Chant Comes (Topside Press)  
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