Perigee

The Gray Area: Gentrification in Manhattan's Hamilton Heights

  by Alexandra Watson, Editor-in-Chief   As a mixed-race graduate student at Columbia living in Hamilton Heights, a neighborhood in Harlem destined for “urban renewal,” my relationship to the word gentrification is ambivalent. As a child, I associated the word “gentrification” solely with white people—I thought it referred specifically and only to the moving of white people into a neighborhood. In popular usage, among my peers and members of my family both black and white, this seems to be the way the word has come to be understood, despite the fact that the word’s real definition refers solely to class and property—“the buying and renovation of stores and houses in deteriorated urban neighborhoods.” The word has taken on a negative connotation, oftentimes rightfully so—gentrification strips a neighborhood of its history, it drives out long-term residents, it either appropriates or overruns culture.

Donate To Our Kickstarter, Feel Good!

Donate To Our Kickstarter, Feel Good! For Apogee Issue 3, we’re bringing you more great writing from authors you do know and from lots that you should know. We’ll also be upgrading our website, and selling more print journals. All we need is a little help from you. We just launched a new Kickstarter to help print more copies of Issue 2, and to help with costs for our re-launch with Issue 3. Please visit the website–read, watch, and consider donating. Every little bit helps!

Notes from "A Guide to Drag Kinging", by Franny Choi

Apogee Journal is pleased to share the first nonfiction piece in our Overshare series,* Franny Choi’s Notes from “A Guide to Drag Kinging.”   “AS YOU PROWL the sidewalk, cross the stage, lights hot and bright on your face, on the front of your pants, feel it hanging, shifting with each step, strapped tight into shorts. Armed and ready, standing at attention. Soon, you will find it affecting your walk, longer lunges that land like declarative sentences…”  

"Eviction Notice," by Brian Patrick Heston

While the Trayvon Martin trial hangs over all of us here at Apogee, despite some small triumphs, some cool blog projects, and the protests that continue — albeit misreported — we thought this poem by Brian Patrick Heston, published in Issue Two of Apogee, fits well as this week’s content share.

Issue Two Overshare

Apogee Journal is pleased to announce that we are now letting loose some of the content from Issue Two here on our website, and on Facebook and Twitter. Twice a week, on Tuesdays and Fridays, we'll post some of the varied, excitingly diverse short stories, poetry and nonfiction that made it into our second, stellar issue.

Issue Two is Here!

Apogee Journal is very pleased to announce the launch of Issue Two of our journal. You can check it out online at our reader, here. Issue Two features poetry from EJ Koh, Marina Blitshteyn, Mark Elias, Aaron Samuels and Brian Patrick Heston, among many sparkling others. Nonfiction from Franny Choi,  Tenzin Dickyi, Sarah Thomas and Sukriti Yadava. And fiction from Zalika Reid-Benta, Brandon Storm, Alberto Gullaba and Elisa Fernandez-Arias.

Issue Two: Call for Submissions

We are proudly accepting submissions for the second issue of Apogee Journal, this literary journal created in 2011 by writers of color and international students in Columbia University’s Creative Writing MFA program. The word apogee denotes the point in an object’s orbit farthest from the center, and we are looking for work that unearths issues and voices that arise ‘from the margins.’ We welcome work from any writers who take on race, social issues, class, and related topics. Think: a creative essay on the nature of privilege; a short story by a woman of color discussing an instance of racism; a white writer’s prose poem about an awareness-raising experience. Prowl the margins, engage this space. Our aim is to provide a forum where unheard voices and issues can rise to the fore. Send your original nonfiction, poetry, and short fiction as a Word document to ApogeeLit@gmail.com. Please keep your prose submissions under 3,000 words and send no more than 3 poems for consideration. Additionally, please include your name, the title of your piece, and its genre in the subject line of the email but exclude your name from the submission itself. Shoot any questions to ApogeeLit@gmail.com Be sure to like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter @Apogeejournal. You can also find a copy of our first issue here on our website,...
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